2716 views 5 commentsupdate:Sep 24, 2012

Viscosity

Ioannis Mavromichalis
Wheat is a major staple in most poultry diets in Europe. But, wheat is also a contributor to gut viscosity, something that is known to predispose birds to necrotic enteritis.

 

It has been suggested limiting wheat to 20% can alleviate this problem, but the alternative cereals often are too expensive. Another solution is using NSP enzymes, but experiences remain variable, depending on the brand of the enzyme used, and the overall diet formulation strategy.

What are your experiences in using enzymes as part of a solution against necrotic enteritis in high-wheat based diets? Of course, in diets devoid of antibiotics!

5 comments

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    Dr Haroon Mushtaq

    Whenever a xylanase is added, it is known to improve performance, presumably by
    decreasing digesta viscosity. It also is seen that this improved performance is linked with a concomitant decrease in numbers of C. Perfringens.
    However, selection of enzyme and percentage of wheat in the diet would be the points to ponder over.

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    Raven

    If possible, should be analyzed the levels and ratio between soluble and insolube arabinoxylans in wheat and after to decide which commercial available enzyme to use.
    The wheat variability is quite high, so personaly I would not choose a single fermentation enzyme unless I am not sure that is working with my wheat.

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    dr. p.m.lunagariya

    viscosity is certainly the problem where wheat is part of feed formulation, and can be overcome the problem by choosing type, quality and quantity of enzyme after carefull review of available data.
    In India mostly farmer uses maize in feed formulation, wheat is beat costlier to include in diet fomulation

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    padmini

    In view of the higher viscosity and the ill-effects of wheat gluten , used as an additive to poultry feed, can we have benefits by combining a intestinal motility modifier like Halquinol at minimum levels to control loose droppings caused by wheat?

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