6126 views 19 commentsupdate:Sep 24, 2012

NSP Enzymes - Which One?

Ioannis Mavromichalis, PhD
There is no doubt poultry benefit the most from enzymes, and this is clearly the case for enzymes against the non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) fraction in cereals. The majority of commercially NSP enzymes fall in the categories of xylanases and beta-glucanases.

 

Now, we all know that all cereals contain NSP at various concentrations, with wheat having a predominance in xylanases and barley in beta-glucanases. But, when it comes to selecting the right enzyme, users are faced with a challenge.

Do you use the enzyme that attacks the major NSP in the main cereal in your formula or do you use a cocktail of both enzymes? Of course, the answer is rather simple if you use a mix of say wheat and barley, but what happens in all-wheat or barley-heavy diets (the latter in combination with maize)?

Do you differentiate between NSP enzymes or do you prefer using a cocktail? That is the question!

I would be really glad to read your opinion as this topic is becoming very ‘hot’ every time cereal prices are going up (and never down!)

19 comments

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    Dr. Asaad El-Sabbagh

    for sure dr.Ioannis , using of specific enzyme according to the target NSP fraction in your grains is the correct way to safe your money and feed

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    Dr Haroon Mushtaq

    You are right, it all depends on the main cereal grain used in the recipe. In Pakistani conditions where wheat usage is common in corn-scarcity periods so xylanase usage should be increased so as to justify its substrate i.e. arbinoxylans.

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    Asharf

    our feed based on only soya and yellow corn so what is the best enzyme used not only for NSP but also protien ,is cipenza is Ok for such use as now I do not know the movement of the market.

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    Pico

    NSP fraction in wheat varies too much to rely on a single fermentation enzyme.

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    Dr. Devendra Verma

    Xylans constitute major percentage of the total NSP present in major cereal raw materials used in poultry that makes up significant substrate. Hence, a good endo-xylanase added in poultry diets will result in the best ROI. Other enzyme activities are un-necessary and may add to the metabolic stress. However, such endo-xylanase should be selected on the basis of its efficacy on both soluble and insoluble xylans, with insoluble xylans being the most important fraction in plant feed raw materials and the most difficult to breakdown. Bacterial endo-xylanase is the best solution to achieve the effect on soluble (for viscosity reduction) and insoluble (for nutrients release) xylans.

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    Pico

    Dr. Devendra Verma, I suspect that you promote (and even sale) a bacterial enzyme :)
    I am not..I am working on the farm level and believe me that I have seen all the sales people from all the producers�
    Sorry but your arguments are very weak and very general, I have doubts that you can get into more details without mentioning the commercial name!
    I quote you : "Xylans constitute major percentage of the total NSP present in major cereal raw materials used in poultry that makes up significant substrate." - as I said before ..to general and from my experience inexact. Do you have a reference to support that? I am using a wheat based diet.
    "Other enzyme activities are un-necessary and may add to the metabolic stress." - wow!! Please forgive my shock! I would be absolutely excited to see a paper that shows a secondary enzyme activity as metabolic stress generator, please provide a reference!

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    Agnes

    I agree with "Pico" and I was also shocked with the statement "enzyme activities are un-necessary and may add to the metabolic stress." I've never heard about secondary enzyme activity as metabolic stress generator. However, I do work for a enzyme producer company, and without mentioning commercial names, recent researches and reviews have shown the importance of multi enzyme complexes (NSPases) to break down cell wall complex structures, mainly in the case of corn, soybean and some alternative ingredients.

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    Dr. Devendra Verma

    Pico,
    Well, I am quite certain that any new change always shocks many people. Coming to help understand the matter, most of the multi-enzymes that have xylanases present in it contain exo-/ endo- / combination of both exo- and endo-xylanase that are derived from fungal origin. If you go by the way how exo-xylanase works, is by cutting xylan chain from "outside" that result in formation of 'xylose' which gets absorbed by the intestine. In reality, this sugar formed is useless as it is not needed in energy cycle and the bird's body has to rather spend energy to excrete out this xylose sugar that has entered in the blood circulation. This is metabolic stress. The problem even further flares up if an enzyme comprise of mix of exo- and endo-xylanase.
    Purified endo-xylanase of bacterial origin work very well in wheat and corn based diets that have significant levels of insoluble xylans. There is no shortage of scientific data and practical cases where bacterial endo-xylanase has shown to outperform many other cocktail enzymes. In my opinion, mention of any commercial names on such blog is unfit.
    I would welcome if you would share your experience with any bacterial xylanase that you might have used in farm level?

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    k s reddy

    Present day feed cost is expensive and hence to reduce the feed cost and for better egg production one should use the feed enzymes.

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    Abdelfetah

    the use of a cocktail of enzymes gives me more satisfaction, my food is composed of yellow corn and soybean wheat bran and barley

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    Rob Patterson

    As Technical Director for a company focused on manufacturing multicarbohydrase enzyme supplements, I very much welcome this line of discussion as it makes the industry reconsider the utility of using single activities for diets that are becoming increasingly complex. I welcome everyone to read the following paper, Poultry Science 90:2013-2023, which argues the case for multiple enzye activity supplementation in poultry diets.
    Please keep pushing the industry to rethink conventional technology as this is becoming more and more important in modern poultry production.
    RP

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    Ashraf

    yes but for our company what is the best practice (enzyme used) as our formula mainly corn and soya (main component) are we better to concentrate on using enzyme work on proteins like ecibenza ,or there is some enzyme work on NSP on these component (corn and soya).

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    Nisse

    The arabinoxylans are the major polysaccharide fraction in all cereals, including barley and oats. Unless you feed very high levels of barley and oats a mixed-linked ß-glucanase is not necessary. All xylanases and �ß-glucanases on the market are targeting these substrates and, although claimed, they have no significant impact on other fibre structures. Releasing, e.g. free xylose due to some xylosidase activity could indeed cause a metabolic stress if released in high amounts. Neither poultry or pigs can utilise xylose although it's readily absorbed in the small intestine.

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    muzi

    xylanase enzyme on maize-soya based diets, according to research, does enhance growth performance but where is the "secret"? Is it in the lowered viscosity which improves nutrient utilisation because the monosaccharide xylose is not useful for energy metabolism?

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    Zeeshan Ahmad

    Well, interesting discussion, I would also like to ask as how the substrate is used by a blend of enzymes.

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    dr.asaad sabbagh

    mr muzi , the main effect of xylanse enzymes in corn soya rations come from 2 ways the 1st and important one is the liberation of nutrients from the arabynoxylanse clusters then digisetion and absorption of them, the 2nd is the reduction of viscosity of ingesta by reducing the arabinoxylanse long chains to shorter fargments (not xylose molecules) so reduce its capabilty to make water adsorption, these are the effecient 2 ways by them the arabinoxylanses enzymes can improve the total feed conversion in corn soya diets

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    Dr.Jadoon

    it is very good topic for discussion and need of time. Raw material prices are going up and we need to look at other cereals and bi-products. Complex enzyme will be effective because of better synergy.

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  • Faisal Qadeer

    I am working in Enzymes NSP and Phytase. I think people are more focusing on Phytase but use of NSP enzyme is better because protease is another essential enzyme for poultry to balance protein which is impotant in feed balancing.

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