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FSA urges public to stop washing raw chicken

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) in the UK has launched a campaign to urge people to stop washing raw chicken in an effort to reduce the risk of contracting campylobacter.

The call comes as new figures show that 44% of people always wash chicken before cooking it – a practice that can spread campylobacter bacteria onto hands, work surfaces, clothing and cooking equipment through the splashing of water droplets.

Campylobacter is the most common form of food poisoning in the UK, affecting an estimated 280,000 people a year. Around four in five of these cases come from contaminated poultry. As part of the call – which comes at the start of this year's Food Safety Week – the FSA has written to production companies that make food programmes, asking them to ensure that people aren't shown washing raw chicken on TV.

FSA chief executive, Catherine Brown, said: "Although people tend to follow recommended practice when handling poultry, such as washing hands after touching raw chicken and making sure it is thoroughly cooked, our research has found that washing raw chicken is also common practice. That's why we're calling on people to stop washing raw chicken and also raising awareness of the risks of contracting campylobacter as a result of cross-contamination.

"Campylobacter is a serious issue. Not only can it cause severe illness and death, but it costs the economy hundreds of millions of pounds a year as a result of sickness absence and the burden on the NHS. Telling the public about the risks and how to avoid them is just one part of our plan to tackle campylobacter. We are leading a campaign that brings together the whole food chain, which includes working with farmers and producers to reduce rates of campylobacter in flocks of broiler chickens and ensuring that slaughterhouses and processors are taking steps to minimise the levels of contamination in birds. We are committed to acting on campylobacter and providing safer food for the nation."

The survey commissioned by the FSA found that levels of awareness of campylobacter are well below that of other forms of food poisoning. More than 90% of the public have heard of salmonella and E.coli, whereas only 28% of people know about campylobacter. Furthermore, of the people who have heard of campylobacter, only 31% of them know that poultry is the main source of the bacteria.

The most cited reasons people gave for washing chicken were the removal of dirt (36%), getting rid of germs (36%) and that that they had always done it (33%).

World Poultry

2 comments

  • SAMIR KUMAR SARKAR

    Obviously ,it is a common practice to wash chickens before cooking since it may be contaminated by dust &dirt.
    INDIAN WOMEN are also prone to wash . If the chickens are washed after covering hands with suitable GLOVES and taking care that wasing area is away from the cooking utensils etc then chances of contamination are less likely.

  • Christopher Don Christopher

    Poultry processors always try to minimize the use of water, for example, following values are for consecutive months average water use per broiler bird in a poultry processing plant (in Sri Lanka and I would not think that these values vary much from country to country); 12.6, 12, 12, 11.7. When considered the level of contamination in the de-feathering machine and in the chill tank, it would not be very much advisable not to wash poultry meat before cooking as there can be minute particles of feacal matters still attached to the carcass after processing.

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