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The World Poultry number 7, 2016 is now online.

This edition looks at the power of networking and the benefits it brings to the poultry industry. Plus a visit to Swaziland to find out more about Project Canaan, where the egg industry with a combined effort with local producers help to feed the malnourished.
Swaziland is prone to famine and malnourishment. The eggs of project Canaan are distributed via a network of 31 local churches. <em>Photo: Kirsten Graumans</em>
Swaziland is prone to famine and malnourishment. The eggs of project Canaan are distributed via a network of 31 local churches. Photo: Kirsten Graumans

Dr Jeff Wilson, President of Novometrix Research Inc, shares his thoughts on network engagement as an essential means to get the world connected to poultry production. Why is network engagement so powerful? “Quite simply,” says Wilson. “It allows us to combine the expertise, buy-in, and resources to create solutions that no single person, political party, or ideology could devise alone.’’

"Improving the image of any industry isn't about 'convincing' 'outsiders' that we are good people with ethical, sustainable practices." <em>Photo: Novometrix</em>
"Improving the image of any industry isn't about 'convincing' 'outsiders' that we are good people with ethical, sustainable practices." Photo: Novometrix

The need for connecting with consumers and others is demonstrated in 2 other articles on the market trend away from cages housing systems for layers. World Poultry delves into the situation in both the US and British markets. At both sides of the Atlantic ocean poultry farmers are puzzled how to cope with the immensely fast changing consumer and retail demands.


  • Animal welfare organisations dominate the debate on cage-free production. Large food companies are moving away from cage eggs. <em>Photo: Michel Zoeter</em>

    Animal welfare organisations dominate the debate on cage-free production. Large food companies are moving away from cage eggs. Photo: Michel Zoeter

  • A few weeks ago Wal-Mart, America's biggest retailer, announced they will only sell cage-free eggs from 2025 on. Photo: ANP

    A few weeks ago Wal-Mart, America's biggest retailer, announced they will only sell cage-free eggs from 2025 on. Photo: ANP

  • Tesco: "We carried out an extensive and collaborative review with our suppliers and key industry experts to help us work through how best we can move to 100% cage-free eggs."

    Tesco: "We carried out an extensive and collaborative review with our suppliers and key industry experts to help us work through how best we can move to 100% cage-free eggs."

Read all about this and much more in our online edition - World Poultry 2016-7

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