News 8089 views 1 commentupdate:Mar 9, 2016

Broilers need less feed with butyric acid in diet

Using a butyric acid product in broilers can reduce the amount of feed with 2%, while maintaining the same bird growth. This was shown by a new study at the Shandong Agricultural University in China.

The research looked at the product ProPhorce™ SR (a butyric acid) and its effect on healthy broilers under normal circumstances. The findings show that with the butyric acid, a significant difference was realized with regard to the feed conversion. At the same time, the research showed constant growth rates. These conclusions are in line with the results which have been achieved with the same product in Europe.

You may also find interesting:
The ins and outs of necrotic enteritis
Of the short chain fatty acids, butyric acid is of primary importance when it comes to gut health with butyrins being one of the most effective forms of this product available.

Strong development of the villi

Professor Yang who led the research explains: "The research showed that you need 2% less feed when using the butyric acid product in order to realise the same daily growth. We also noticed an increase in villi length up to 35%. The animal's feed uptake capacity was enhanced by the strong development of the intestinal wall, so the chicken will use the feed more efficiently. This results in a lower feed conversion."

You may also find interesting:
Preventive intestinal health through a multifactorial nutrition based health approach
It seems inevitable that the use of medication in animal production worldwide will decline in the future and preventive health management 
strategies will be the way forward. Where legislation is not already in place, consumer pressure is 
building up on the use of antimicrobials.

Symposium at ESPN

The results of this study will be further explained at the upcoming European Symposium on Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) in Prague. During the congress, Perstorp Feed & Food (producer of the butyric acid product) will organise a mini symposium, which will focus on these recent Chinese findings, earlier scientific studies and field testing.

One comment

Or register to be able to comment.